If you’re ever interested in getting into WordPress plugins, then there’s a wide array of material available for you to read – this includes material across who-knows-how-many blogs, people on Twitter, and even physical books available on Amazon or likely your local bookstore (well, maybe – heh). But when it comes to building and maintaining a free plugin (let alone several), I’ve found that there’s not as much discussion, sharing, and overall dissemination of information available. To that end, I thought it might be worth looking at four things that I’ve found useful when maintaining free WordPress plugins. Free WordPress Plugins To that end, I thought it might be worth sharing a few things that I’ve found useful when maintaining free plugins. First and foremost, the challenge of building and maintaining free plugins is that they become our responsibility – they can become a time suck – and they detract from our paying gigs and the primary reward comes in serving people and their blogs above all else. This is certainly not a complaint, but it’s the nature of maintaining a free project. On top of that, that doesn’t mean it’s an excuse to mistreat, abuse, or ignore your users, either.
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