When WordPress switched to Open Sans in version 3.8 at the end of 2013, the state of typography on the web was just beginning to evolve. Before, our choices for typefaces were limited to a small subset of fonts reliably installed on most major operating systems. And, in some cases, those fonts were optimized for print, not the web. Open Sans is optimized for the screen, has generous character support, and, best of all, is open source. For these reasons, it was a better option for a modern web app than the system fonts of that time. Today, the landscape has changed. The majority of our users are now on devices that use great system fonts for their user interface. System fonts load more quickly, have better language support, and make web apps look more like native apps. By using the same font that the user’s device does, WordPress looks more familiar as a result. This change prioritizes consistency from the user’s perspective over consistency in branding. And while typography does play a role in the WordPress brand, the use of color, iconography, and information architecture still feels very much like WordPress. To this end, Font Natively (#36753) replaces Open Sans with a
Share This

We are using cookies on our website

Please confirm, if you accept our tracking cookies. You can also decline the tracking, so you can continue to visit our website without any data sent to third party services.